Building an email campaign as a training solution … in your LMS

Reading time: 4 minutes

Thanks to Bersin by Deloitte’s research we know that employees these days have but 1% of a typical workweek to focus on training and development. That’s 24 minutes per week if you’re working a 40 hour contract. I’m on 32 hour contract so that’s 5 minutes less.

How can we deliver training to employees that meets that reality? There are some important things we can do as Mark D’aquin states in his article ‘5 ways to meet the need of the modern learner’.

He states that we should…

  • prioritize the learner
  • complete a proper analysis and design process
  • simplify the experience – limit the content and make it bite-sized
  • design for usability (mobile accessible and available)
  • choose the right tool(s) for development

Delivering an email campaign

With that in mind, I recently delivered my first training solution in an email campaign format. It’s a format I’ve encountered over a decade ago when I signed up to an instructional design course by Connie Malamed but have not seen it as a regular delivery model, especially not within organizations. 

The format has a lot of benefits. It’s delivered over time, it requires short engaging pieces of content, it can be used to focus on relevant topics in each email, it gets delivered to your inbox, whether that’s on your phone, tablet or laptop and because there’s mainly text in email it has to be really simple.

I did my research and looked at what was happening in the field when it comes to using email as a training delivery method. I signed up for various courses I found to get a feel for how others are treating the format. In the end I liked the 10-day courses from Highbrow bes.

The format was really good as was the length. I wasn’t so sure about the daily delivery but figured that I could be flexible with that. A weekly email felt like a more appropriate to leave space for reflection and possible on-the-job practice activities.

A prototype says more than a 1000 meetings

I quickly prototyped an email in Outlook making sure it had a good structure so people would understand why this could work as a training solution.

I basically setup a structure like this:

  • What is [topic] in my context?
  • Why is [topic] in my context important?
  • How do I apply [topic] in my context?
    • reflective question(s)
    • on-the-job practice activity
  • Learn more (external content)

I opted to add the use of explainer video in the what/why section linking out to video content that could be short and engaging. The How section had to be a clear call to action and really had to stand out. The learn more section was to link to additional existing content that would deepen the experience but wasn’t required to understand the what, why and how of the topic.

Explaining the concept of a 8/10 week training program where a single email a week is delivered to your inbox and showing the prototype got me a lot of feedback. People were very interested and positive to try it out.

Doing more with less

When figuring out how to deliver this I started looking at common email marketing tools. I found MailChimp to be a leader in its industry and started investigating if this would work in our organization while considering alternatives for if it wouldn’t.

After extensive testing, and well on our way putting the developed content in MailChimp, we found that we were not able to make it work all across the globe and had to switch to plan B.I knew our LMS was able to send HTML emails as reminders but how would I be able to trigger them? I was not building a standard elearning package right? In the end that was actually how I managed to make it work.

The way I set-up the training was by creating a one-page SCORM package in Articulate Storyline. The one page module basically thanked participants for signing up to the course and explained that they’ll be receiving a weekly email for 8 weeks and that they should head over to their inbox as the first email might drop in any time now.

After we had set that up in the LMS we added a 10 reminder emails, each separated by 7 days. Each email was a nicely designed HTML email, using an engaging header image, an image that linked to our internal video platform for the topic specific explainer animation video and a brightly colored ‘call-to-action’ section that contained the reflection and practice activities.

The last email asks the participant to go back to the SCORM package and click the ‘complete’ button so the LMS registers the training as completed. At first I had a big obvious complete button but we noticed that participants don’t read instructions very well and immediately clicked the complete button which actually stopped the reminders from being send. After all, the training is marked compete…

Luckily this was easily solved by updating the layout of the SCORM package and removing focus from that complete button. After that it was smooth sailing. People in the organisation were finding our training in the LMS and leaving very positive feedback!

I’m super happy with how the training and its delivery turned out and love the simplicity of it. This is definitely something I’ll use again.

Questions, thoughts? Leave me a comment below.

Jeff.

Articulate Gebruikersdagen 2018

Vandaag sprak ik op de 8e Articulate gebruikersdagen in Utrecht. In mijn sessie besprak ik de 20 vragen de je moet stellen om tot een goede business case te komen voor een training en support oplossing. Ik geloof dat dit een cruciale stap is die genomen moet worden voordat je gaat beginnen met een leerdoelen analyse. Een training hoeft immers niet de oplossing te zijn voor het probleem dat je klant heeft.

Het was de eerste keer dat ik deze vragen in een soort van ‘inspiratiesessie’ deelde en de feedback die ik kreeg was erg goed. Het is altijd mooi om te zien dat het klikt bij de deelnemers van een sessie.

Hieronder vind je mijn slides en daarmee alle vragen. Succes!

20 questions to ask before talking about learning objectives!

Reading time: 2,5 minutes
This post appeared first on LinkedIn.

I’ve been in Learning and Development for over 12 years now. It has been quite the learning journey for me, as I went from starting out in the role to being, well…, more experienced. One of the things that have continuously evolved over the years are the questions I’m asking my clients. Asking the right questions makes all the difference.

When I started out as an e-learning specialist my questions were focused on building the best possible e-learning module. Over the years I’ve learned that even though my job title might constrict me to ‘learning and development’, focusing on the product of a training request isn’t the best way to help my clients nor my organization.

I should be asking questions about the problem or change that we are trying to address and that address the desired outcome. I should not be jumping into learning objectives and solutions from the go. …and neither should you!

So what are the right questions to ask?

Good question! As I mentioned, my list of questions is an ever-evolving one.

The questions below have helped me, and my clients tremendously in painting a clear picture of where we are, where we want to be and how to prove what we are doing is actually working!

I am sharing these with you because we, as Learning and Development professionals need to better. We need to stop being a course factory and start building learning and performance solutions that actually work in the long term.

These questions, rooted in performance consulting, might just help you get started!

20 Questions to ask before talking about learning objectives!

  1. What is the problem/challenge you are trying to address?
  2. What is the business reason for this request?
  3. Do you have an idea for a solution in mind already?
  4. Who are the stakeholders and what are their roles (RACI)? What is their stake in this?
  5. Have you done a root cause analysis for the problem/challenge? What is the result?
  6. What will happen if we do nothing? What is the impact to the organization?
  7. What changes will we see in the organization when we implement this solution (What does success look like)?
  8. How can we measure the impact of the solution (with existing means)?
  9. Are there existing/immediate issues and/or behaviors that need addressing?
  10. What areas affect the desired outcome (Ability, Motivation, Organisational barriers …)?
  11. What are risks/challenges we need to consider?
  12. What is the desired timeline? Why this timeline?
  13. Is there a budget (range) known?
  14. What does the Target audience look like? How many people? Different roles? New starters? Existing? Access to digital? Mandatory? Language requirements? When will they take this training? Where would they look for information/support? …?
  15. Which others are affected by this problem/challenge?
  16. Which employees (5) can we talk to that experience/are impacted by the problem/challenge?
  17. What materials are available already and where? Is it being used? What works, what does not (proven)? Reusable? Scalable?
  18. Which technical requirements and limitations do we need to take into account?
  19. Which cultural aspects do we need to take into account?
  20. Is there anything relevant to this project I should know that I haven’t asked about?

So what are your thoughts? Questions, remarks? Drop me a comment below!

My favorite Learning & Development books!

Reading time: 2.5 minutes
This post appeared first on LinkedIn.

I often get asked what my favorite learning and development books are. I love books, especially those written by thought leaders in our industry. There’s such a wealth of information in them and they can be a great resource on the go. Here are a few books (in random order) I’d recommend to any L&D/HRD Professional.

702010 towards 100% performance [link]

This book really helped me understand the 702010 framework. It is an amazingly well-designed book that is very thorough. Jos, Charles and Vivian describe how the three pieces of the puzzle come together via a distinct set of roles that should exist within a modern L&D department.

Innovative Performance Support: Strategies and Practices for Learning in the Workflow [link]

This is probably the oldest book on my list as I had the honor to proofread it some years ago. Any organization that is moving from the traditional ‘training mindset’ to a modern ‘performance mindset’ will find this book extremely useful as it focuses on Performance Support in the workplace. To me, this methodology is the most pragmatic way to start the 702010 journey.

Learning in the Modern Workplace [link]

Honestly, I love Jane Hart and everything she does for our industry. Her book(s) and blog should be mandatory for anyone that is involved in an L&D or HRD role. Jane’s book is absolutely one of my favorites. An absolute must-have!

Show your work [link]

Jane Bozarth put together a great book that truly shows the value of ‘working out loud’. By showing your work you support productivity, improve performance, encourage reflective practice, and so much more.

Revolutionize Learning & Development: Performance and Innovation Strategy for the Information Age [link]

Okay, I’ve only read a GetAbstract book summary but I still want to put this one on this list. I think Clark Quinn really sends a clear message with his book and understands the need and urgency for L&D to change like no other! I’ll add this book to my bookshelf as soon as I’ve completed the books on my nightstand.

Sprint: How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days [link]

I’ve only recently come across Design thinking and Sprints for learning but I find it an amazing process that really helps you step away from the solution and helps you find out what really works before spending a lot of time and money on a solution that won’t get the results you’re looking for. There’s also a great explanatory video playlist right [here].

Slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations [link]

Training and workplace supporting materials are often slide-based. Nancy Duarte is the queen of presentations and her book is a great addition to anyone that creates learning materials.

All Articulate e-books [link]

As an Articulate Super Hero, it might be obvious to add this to the list. The team at Articulate has really put together a great set of compact e-learning design related e-books that will help any starting professional creating better e-learning.

Steal like an Artist [link]

I love this little book! Austin Kleon tells a great story. Get inspired by him and by the work of others to get better yourself. I’ve learned so much from other people’s work, deconstructing, recreating examples with the tools I have at my disposal.

These books are currently on my nightstand

I truly believe these books will help you grow as a professional and in turn, you will help grow our profession from course factory to strategic business partner!

Thoughts, insights? Any books you would like to recommend? Leave me a note in the comments below. And if you like this post please share it with your network.

Van 70.000 naar 1.000 trainingsuren! De Kracht van Performance Support

Leestijd: 6 minuten
Deze post verscheen eerst op LinkedIn.

In 2016 is AkzoNobel Corporate IT begonnen met de globale uitrol van Office365. De eerste applicatie die globaal beschikbaar werd was Sharepoint Online. Deze applicatie verving het oude Sharepoint 2010 waarop het intranet draaide. De implementatie is door AkzoNobel aangegrepen om een aantal organisatorische en procedurele verbetering door te voeren omtrent het gebruik van SharePoint Online.

Ik werd vanuit mijn rol bij Global Learning & Development benaderd om mee te denken met de adoptie van SharePoint Online, het nieuwe intranet, en het opzetten van de benodigde training voor de verschillende doelgroepen.

Corporate IT had al nagedacht over een de oplossing en zaten te denken aan het volgende:

  1. Voor de doelgroep ‘Alle medewerkers’ wilden ze graag een half uur elearning om ze te trainen in de basics van sharepoint gevolgd door een webinar van één uur om specifieke zaken toe te lichten.
  2. Voor de doelgroep ‘Site-owners’ wilden ze graag een half uur elearning en één dag klassikale training, gevolgd door 2 follow-up webinars van één uur.
  3. Voor de doelgroep ‘News-editors’ wilden ze graag een workshop van een dagdeel (4 uur) om ze kennis te laten maken met het nieuwe news-center.

Ik zette deze wensen op een rijtje en berekende hoeveel trainingsuren dit zou opleveren om te kijken wat de impact zou zijn op de organisatie, iets wat ik altijd doe bij een globale uitrol. In totaal zou deze oplossing de organisatie zo’n 70.000 uur aan training kosten, los van de ontwikkeling van het trainingsmateriaal. 70.000 manuren, daar schrokken we wel van. Hoe zou dat anders kunnen?

Ik stelde voor om op basis van het 5 Moments of Need analysemodel een inschatting te maken van wat er nodig is. Dit leermodel focust op de kritische en belangrijke taken die de doelgroepen moeten uitvoeren en de daarbij benodigde kennis. Het richt zich dus op de prestatie van de medewerker in zijn of haar specifieke rol, in dit geval, werken met SharePoint Online.

Door een Performance bril…

Samen met een Performance consultant die gespecialiseerd was in het 5 Moments of Need model en inhoudsdeskundigen van Corporate IT werd een taakanalyse en kritische vaardigheden analyse workshop gehouden. Op basis hiervan kwamen we al snel tot de conclusie dat de ‘alle medewerkers’ doelgroep niet veel kritische taken had en eigenlijk geen directe training nodig had. Ze zouden goed geholpen kunnen worden met ‘How-to’ achtige Job-aids en Quick reference materialen. Doordat deze groep geen formele training zou ontvangen viel er ineens zo’n 48.000 uur aan training weg. Het leren vindt plaats tijdens het werk doordat ze altijd beschikking hebben over het naslagwerk.

Hetzelfde deden we voor de ‘site-owners’. Daar kwamen wel wat kritische taken naar voren, bijvoorbeeld het zetten van de juiste rechten binnen de site, maar ook een hoop taken die wel belangrijk waren maar niet per sé in een training hoeven, zoals het zetten van een notificatie op een document library. Deze taken zouden ook toegankelijk gemaakt kunnen worden met ‘How-to’ achtige Job-aids en Quick reference materialen zoals dat ook bij de ‘alle gebruikers’ doelgroep zou gebeuren. Het resultaat van deze analyse leidde tot één elearning module van een half uur waarin alleen de kritische taken behandeld werden en waarin Site-owners leerden waar ze deze informatie en de overige belangrijke taken konden terugvinden op de daarvoor opgezette support portal (een Sharepoint intranet site). Hierdoor gingen we van 21.000 uur naar 1000 uur training en werd dus zo’n 20.000 uur aan formele training bespaard.

Als laatste werd samen met Corporate Communicatie de kleine doelgroep ‘News-editors’ onder de loep genomen en ook hier hetzelfde resultaat. De 4 uur durende workshop werd teruggebracht naar een korte elearningmodule van 15 minuten waarin de kritische en belangrijke taken op een ‘how to…’ wijze gepresenteerd werden. Korte videos en duidelijke, kort uitgeschreven stappen maakten de module direct een tool die tegelijk kon dienen als referentiemateriaal om naar terug te grijpen.

De twee dagen durende 5 Moments of Need analyseworkshop had zijn geld dubbel en dwars opgeleverd. Er was een duidelijk inzicht in de doelgroepen, hun kritische en belangrijke taken en de daarbij benodigde kennis en hoe deze optimaal aan te bieden aan de diverse doelgroepen. Daarbij werd de formele trainingsduur teruggebracht van 69.128 uur naar 1008 uur!

Meten is weten!

Het terugbrengen van de formele trainingsuren was één ding. Als we al die informatie via een support portal zouden aanbieden moest dat natuurlijk ook wel gebruikt worden. Hoe laat je de doelgroepen weten waar ze deze informatie vinden en hoe ze het kunnen gebruiken? Hoe meet je hierin of je succesvol bent?

Bij AkzoNobel werd besloten om binnen het SharePoint intranet een intranetsite op te zetten die zich volledig richtte op de ondersteuning van de migratie en de adoptie van het nieuwe platform. Deze site was erg makkelijk te vinden doordat er een grote banner werd geplaatst op de landingspagina van het intranet en door de e-mailcommunicatie rondom de lancering van het nieuwe intranet.

Door wekelijks de SharePoint statistieken bij te houden zagen we dat de eerste weken de support portal 5.000 tot 7.000 keer per week bezocht werd. Een paar maanden later zagen we dat zakken tot een stabiele 500 tot 700 keer per week. De portal werkte. Mensen wisten het te vinden en maakten er gebruik van.

Uit navraag bij de helpdesk leerde we dat het aantal vragen dat daar binnenkwam lang niet zo hoog was als verwacht. Daarnaast was de portal ook een ideale plek om medewerkers weer naar toe te verwijzen omdat de veel voorkomende vragen doorgaans al behandeld waren binnen de support portal. Nieuwe vragen en informatie konden ook makkelijk toegevoegd worden aan de portal waardoor de portal actueel bleef en de waarde van de portal bleef groeien. 

SharePoint als performance support portal

Bij AkzoNobel hebben we bewust gekozen om gebruik te maken van de infrastructuur die aanwezig is. Daarom hebben we in SharePoint, binnen de bestaande templates een structuur opgebouwd zodat de medewerkers snel bij de juiste informatie kunnen komen. Dit alles vraaggestuurd (Hoe doe ik…) en op basis van rol, waar mogelijk.Op deze manier krijg je als Site-owner dus alleen de informatie die voor jouw rol relevant is en hoef je dus zelf minder te zoeken en te filteren.

Op deze manier krijg je als Site-owner dus alleen de informatie die voor jouw rol relevant is en hoef je dus zelf minder te zoeken en te filteren.

Sneller resultaat, minder tijd aan het zoeken en vlug weer verder met je werk!

Op de site worden Site-owners gewezen op hun verantwoordelijkheden als owner en de daarbij verplichte e-learing. Aan de zijkant zien ze alle beschikbare referentiematerialen. Dit is een combinatie van standaard Online SharePoint help pagina’s (handig want dit wordt door Microsoft onderhouden), eigen Job-aids, videos, etc.

Job-aids

De Job-aids zijn nog al eens aan verandering onderhevig en daarom is er gekozen voor een eenvoudig maar effectief gebruik van een Word template. Weinig vormgeving maar wel een duidelijke structuur volgens de 5 Moments of Need methodologie.

Een bijkomend voordeel voor het IT team dat de support portal beheert is dat ze direct, online in SharePoint de Word documenten kunnen aanpassen wanneer er een update nodig is. Het versiebeheer word geregeld door SharePoint en ze hoeven niet steeds nieuwe documenten te creëren en te uploaden!Video’s

Video’s

Doordat Office365 ook een video platform heeft is het uploaden en delen van videos makkelijker dan ooit. Een korte schermopname is zo gemaakt en gedeeld via de support portal waar het direct ge-embed kan worden in een pagina of document. Door de ‘Commentaar’ functie kunnen medewerkers aangeven of er nog onduidelijkheden zijn of andere praktische tips aandragen.Van support tot micro-learning

De verschillende elementen van de support portal kunnen ook gecombineerd worden om er een korte elearning module van te maken. Bij AkzoNobel hebben we gekozen een module te ontwikkelen die op elk device toegankelijk is om het optimaal toegankelijk te maken voor de gebruikers. Het is een verzameling van korte videos uit de lanceer-communicatie en support portal en de quick-steps uit de job-aids die per rol beschikbaar zijn. Ook voor de e-mailcommunicatie voor de lancering werden materialen uit de support portal herbruikt.

Op deze manier kun je op efficiënt de beschikbare materialen voor meerdere doeleinden inzetten.

Conclusie

Soms kan een training een goed plan lijken maar het is ontzettend belangrijk te kijken wat alle bijkomende factoren, in dit geval tijdsbesteding, zijn om een compleet beeld te schetsen.

We de organisatie niet alleen een werkdisruptie van ruim 68.000 manuur bespaard, we hebben de 46.000 medewerkers van AkzoNobel ook niet nodeloos blootgesteld aan ‘generieke’ training die weinig relevant was, en snel vergeten zou worden.

Minder training, meer ondersteuning, hogere impact!

We hebben de impact inzichtelijk gemaakt middels de beschikbare statistieken en aangetoond dat de oplossing werkt. We hebben alle trainingsmaterialen in-house kunnen ontwikkelen met bestaande middelen en daarmee gezorgd dat we het ook zelf kunnen onderhouden.

Daarnaast is het team van Corporate IT is door de 5 Moments of Need workshop zelf in staat om nieuwe materialen en zelfs nieuwe projecten te analyseren.

Dat maakt de medewerkers blij, dat maakt de organisatie blij en het maakt mij blij om als Learning & Development professional een waardevolle bijdrage te leveren aan de impact van het project binnen de organisatie.

Create a screen-recording with Skype for Business

Reading time: 2 minutes
This post appeared first on LinkedIn.

Doing more with less

I often talk to L&D professionals that share their concerns regarding the lack of budget, resources and tools. Recently I spoke with someone, let’s call him ‘Bob’, that wanted to start recording quick how-to videos but he stated that he did not have the right software and wouldn’t be able to get the budget to acquire it. Low and behold, Bob didn’t realize he already had a tool he could use only he never thought of using it that way…

Ever since attending the session of Jane Bozarth and Jo Cook at Online Educa Berlin’16 I’ve had an extra eye out for such ‘I can’t’ remarks. It’s true that in ever faster spinning hamster-wheel of life we often overlook what is right in front of us. During their session Jane and Jo highlighted how you can do more with less. Make better and smarter use of what you’ve got by looking beyond how tools are commonly used and start looking at how you can use them to meet your needs.

So getting back to Bob. I asked him if they used an online meeting platform. They did; Skype for business. As you may be aware, these kind of tools often have the possibility to record your meeting session. Slides that have been shared, including the narration are recorded and available as some sort of movie file. When I pointed that out to Bob he told me he had done that a couple of times but doesn’t use it often. Cool! he’d actually used that before, so he knew how to record an online meeting.

I said:”What if… you host a meeting with just yourself, share your desktop or application and record the how-to videos?”. A little twinkle appear in his eyes…

A day later he contacted me, overjoyed, that he had just finished his first set of screen-cast videos. He had shared them with his manager and both were happy with the result!

As you can see, there is a solution for every problem it’s all a matter of #doingmorewithless. It might not be a perfect solution, but at least your moving forward!

Never let perfection stand in the way of progress.

Want to give it a go yourself? Check out the quick steps below:

Creating a screen recording with Lync or Skype for Business is fairly simple.

  1. Plan a meeting with yourself and access the meeting.
  2. Share your desktop or program (e.g. PowerPoint)
  3. In Skype go to the more options section – The ellipse (…) icon
  4. Click start recording to record your session.
  5. Do your presentation, talk through your slides.
  6. In Skype go to the more options section – The ellipse (…) icon
  7. Click Stop recording (you can also pause here)

The recording will be processed and stored locally as an .mp4 video file. Share it via your intranet, add it to an e-learning course or upload it to a video server such as YouTube or Vimeo.

Record and play back a Skype for Business meeting

For more detailed information check out this Microsoft support page on how to record a Skype for Business meeting.

Zo maak je e-Learning weer effectief

Waar denk jij aan als je aan e-learning denkt?

Een goede manier om je vaardigheden te vergroten? Een prettige manier van leren? Voor veel mensen brengt de term e-learning helaas weinig positieve gedachten te weeg.

Zij zien het vooral als een saaie manier van leren. Het gros van de e-learning modules zijn vaak niet meer dan veredelde PowerPoint presentaties die even snel in een auteurstool zijn geknald. Slide na slide met informatie, bulletpoints en als leerdoel heeft alles ‘dit moeten de gebruikers weten’. Zinvol? Relevant? Vaak lijkt daar niet over nagedacht.

Maar hoe voorkom je nou dat jouw e-learning module niet meer is dan een grote ‘brain-dump’? Wat moet je doen om de medewerker het gevoel te geven dat ze hun tijd zinvol besteed hebben en dat het juist heel praktisch is om via e-learning te leren?

“Less is More!”

Kent u die uitdrukking? Een van de eerste syptomen van een brain-dump is dat werkelijk alles maar dan ook alles wat er over een onderwerp valt te vertellen in de training zit. De inhoudsdeskundige vind het vaak lastig onderscheid te maken tussen nice-to-know en need-to-know. Dat is ook niet gek, voor de inhoudsdeskundige is het vaak ook allemaal belangrijk. Daarom zijn zij juist de expert in dit specifieke onderwerp. Een kritische schifting is nodig om te bepalen wat er wel en juist niet in een e-learning module moet komen.

“One size-fits all”

Ik werk het grootste deel van mijn carierre voor grote organisaties en heb daar tal van trainingen mogen ontwikkelen. Als we een doelgroepanalyse deden bleken we al snel op een grote diversiteit van verschillende soorten doelgroepen te definieren. Dit resulteerde helaas niet in het inzicht dat we voor de diverse doelgroepen specifiek toegespitste trainingen gingen maken maar dat we juist alles gingen ‘veralgemeniseren’.  Op die manier hoefden we maar één training te ontwikkelen en konden we die waar nodig gewoon vertalen. Heel praktisch… maar de meest zinvolle oplossing? Nou nee.

hoe voorkom je nou dat jouw e-learning module niet meer is dan een grote ‘brain-dump’?

JEFF KORTENBOSCH

Ga maar na, je volgt een training van één uur. 20% is relevante informatie, iets waar je in jouw rol in de organisatie echt iets aan hebt. De overige 80% is vrij algemeen en doet er niet echt toe. De relevante 20% staat echter verspreid door de niet relevante 80%. Hoeveel van de informatie komt er nu echt bij je binnen? Wat blijft er ook daadwerkelijk hangen? Als je je e-learning toespitst op de 20% relevante informatie gediferentieerd op specifieke rollen die mensen in je organisatie hebben word het voor hen 100% relevant en is de werkverstoring van één uur ineens een effectieve maatwerk training van 20 minuten die 100% relevant is. De medewerker wint dus 40 minuten van zijn tijd terug en de bestede tijd is ook nog eens heel zinvol. Ik word daar enthousiast van!

“Een goede analyse zorgt voor een effectievere training!”

Een voorwaarde om tot een effectieve en dus relevante training te komen is een goede analyse. Helaas is dit iets waar het bij de meeste projecten aan ontbreekt. Als je geluk hebt wil de klant nog wel even kort nadenken over de leerdoelen van de module die gemaakt moet worden maar in de regel is vooral haast geboden. Ik ben dit jaar (weer) aan de slag met het ‘5 moments of need’ model en hierin vind je een bijzonder krachtige en eenvoudige manier om een leerbehoefteanalyse te doen. Het uitgangspunt is dat we moeten kijken naar hoe we medewerkers het best kunnen ondersteunen op hun werkplek, op het moment dat zij hun taken uitvoeren. Je gaat dus kijken naar de rollen die medewerkers hebben en welke taken zij uitvoeren. Een systeemtraining gaat dus niet meer over het systeem maar over de manier waarop medewerkers het moeten gebruiken. Een wezenlijk verschil.

De leerbehoeftanalyse van het 5 moments of need model is eenvoudig en bestaat uit de volgende drie onderdelen:

  • Een ‘job task’ analyse
  • Een ‘critical skills’ analyse
  • Het opzetten van een learning experience en performance plan

Een voorbeeld

Een job task analyse definieert de verschillende rollen die medewerkers hebben. Zo zouden de rollen voor een SharePoint training bijvoorbeeld; alle medewerkers, team-site owners, team-site members en communicatie personeel kunnen zijn. Elke rol gebruikt het SharePoint platform op een andere manier en bieden we dus content aan die voor hen relevant is. De rol ‘Alle medewerkers’ consumeert vooral informatie. Zij moeten dus bekend zijn met de basis van het zoeken en vinden van informatie en het navigeren binnen het platform. Wellicht zijn er nog specifieke settings in hun profiel die belangrijk zijn die toegelicht moeten worden zodat informatie die gepusht word door de organisatie goed bij hen aankomt. Een ‘Team-site owner’ is echter een veel technischere rol.

Zij zijn verantwoordelijk voor een site op sharepoint en moeten weten hoe ze de juiste toegang kunnen geven, hoe ze informatie kunnen afschermen en hoe ze informatie kunnen delen, hoe document libraries worden opgezet en hoe ze content kunnen verwijderen en eventueel terugzetten.

Je ziet dat de trainingsbehoefte en noodzaak van deze twee rollen heel anders is. Door toe te spitsen wat mensen doen vind je de relevantie van het materiaal dat je ze moet aanbieden.

Nadat je de job task analyse hebt voltooid kun je gaan kijken wat ‘kritieke vaardigheden’ zijn.

Kritieke vaardigheden zijn de taken die medewerkers uitvoeren die, als ze fout gaan, een grote impact hebben. Zo zullen er voor de rol ‘Alle medewerkers’ weinig kritische vaardigheden te definieren zijn. Immers als ze iets niet kunnen vinden op SharePoint zal dat geen grote gevolgen hebben voor de organisatie. Als we kijken naar de rol van de ‘Team-site owners’ dan is dat een ander verhaal. Als de owner niet in staat is bepaalde informatie af te schermen is het wellicht toegankelijk voor personen die daar niet voor gemachtigd zijn. Zou zouden bijvoorbeeld reorganisatie plannen al kunnen lekken voordat zou mogen gebeuren met alle gevolgen van dien.

De kritische skills analyse helpt je te bepalen en diferentieren wat er absoluut in een training moet zitten en wat als ‘extra informatie’ aangeboden kan worden.

Als je deze twee stappen, de job task analyse en kritische skills analyse hebt voltooid kun je gaan kijken welke (leer) oplossing het beste past bij de diverse taken om zo tot een effectieve mix van leeroplossingen te komen die wel effectief, zinvol en relevant is. Binnen de 5 moments of need doen ze dat in een overzichtelijke excel sheet waarbij je aankruist welke leer- of performance support oplossing het beste past bij de uitkomst van de voorgaande analyse.

Op deze manier word jouw e-learning geen brain-dump maar een compacte en effectieve leeroplossing!

 

Meer weten van het 5 moments of Need model en de daarbij horende learning needs analyse?

#FREEBIE: Minimalistic Storyline player menu and navigation controls

Hey everyone,

I’ve been playing around with a new menu with navigation controls.

Check out the YouTube video right here

The template contains

  • the menu plus nav controls on the left and right side of the screen
  • Dark and light grey versions for left hand section
  • Dark and light grey, blue, red, green and yellow versions for the right hand side

Everything is put on a Master slide so you can adapt anything you want right there. If you have any questions or comments drop me a line in the comments or contact me directly.

Play with it here  |  Download the Storyline2 source file here

Enjoy!
Jeff

 

This post appeared first at community.articulate.com

Creating a Switch/Toggle button – Motion Paths vs. Object States

motion-vs-state

This week I was working on Articulate community e-learning challenge #97: Toggle, Switch, and Slide Your Way to More Creative E-Learning Buttons. I contemplated various ideas and built a quick prototype. I was pretty happy with it and moved on to the design of the interaction. Building a toggle button/switch is a game of ‘states’. You’ve got an on state and an off state. Pretty simple right. All you have to do is choose what you want for your overall look and feel so I googled for ‘switch button design’ and was presented with a ton of possibilities. Some very trendy, some very cool, some rather boring. I did a similar search on Pinterest.

switch
Plenty of design options when creating a switch/toggle button.

To be thorough I even added ‘CSS’ to my search which added in a couple of nice animated buttons (example1 | example2| example3) and that set me to created animated switch buttons.

The first thing I did was rebuild Kevin Thorn’s example. It has a sweet, smooth motion path sliding the button back and forth. It’s a real beauty. It took me about 10 minutes to setup, test if I added all the triggers and conditions correctly and to see if the motion paths are properly aligned and basically do what I expect them to do. As usual I had to do a little tweaking with the order of the triggers to make sure the up and down movement was working properly but after 15 minutes I had myself a schwéééét animated switch button. I started to create a second button and started to copy and adapt it, making sure the new variables, motion paths etc were set-up correctly. Once testing it I noticed I missed something (again) and fixed it. I was quickly getting annoyed with all this tweaking. I was spending a lot of time with just a couple of @#$%^&! buttons.

I started thinking about time spent and effectiveness and the added value of the animation on the button. I thought, how long would it take me to build a regular button with a ‘normal’ state and a default ‘selected’ state. 2 minutes later I had an identical, yet non-animated, button. It worked perfectly, it required no variables or triggers to change states and and play various entrance and exit animations. It just worked. Making a copy was even quicker as I didn’t have to make any changes to any triggers, variables, motion paths and conditions. And the end result looked pretty good.

So, what to do? Should I go with the animated switch buttons or should I go with the effective ‘default’ button? Let’s put them together and decide…

 

Powered by elearningfreak.com

So there you have it.

It’s a bit like comparing a Ferrari with a Volkswagen. The animated button is a thing of beauty. When looking at them together I instinctively know I want it. The default button is just so… default. However… although the animated button is awesome it is, like a Ferrari, a costly thing. It takes more time to build, test and work to get it going as well as doing maintenance to it, then it does to create 20 regular buttons that are still pretty nice and get the job done. Is the additional time spend really adding value to your project?

So what would you do? Would you spend the time or save the dime? Would your client and users love you or hate you for your choice?

Love to hear your thoughts in the comments below!

 

Create a highlight effect for your software simulations in Articulate Storyline

Are you creating a lot of software training simulations or interactions? Then this might be a great tutorial for you.

I started out creating a lot of software training using Adobe Captivate. The recording feature in Articulate Storyline is one of my favorite features. It allows us to create super cool software simulations very fast and very easy. Another thing I find really cool is that Storyline allows us to add our own interactions to those software simulations once they’ve been recorded.

The other day I was watching a lynda.com tutorial and the presenter used in really simple, but cool highlight feature. Unfortunately such a feature is not default in Articulate Storyline but… we can easily create it ourselves.

Take a look at the video above and see how you can create your own highlight effect using Articulate Storyline.