Looping Animations in Articulate Storyline

Looping animations in Storyline, by default there is no such thing (wouldn’t that be nice). However during a recent Articulate e-learning challenge about button animation and effects, an idea popped into my mind that I wanted to share with you.

Back in the days of Articulate Studio’09 there used to be a next button in the default player that started pulsating when the timeline ended. This was a perfect way to indicate users that they should click that the content on that slide had played out and they should click the next button to continue.

When Storyline 1 came out with its new player as well as Studio’13, the pulsating button had vanished as a feature in the default menu. Now some years later I still see the question being asked from time-to-time how to enable the pulsating button.
looping animation

This is where looping animations come in. If I am able to change the appearance of a button with a fade-in and fade-out animation, two basic entrance and exit animations in Storyline, I could mimic such an effect. The fade effect should be really short and… it should loop until the user clicks that next button to jump to the next slide.

This is exactly what I made happen. Check the demo and tutorial video below to learn how. If you like you can download the Storyline 2 source file to see how I did it.

Play Demo   Watch Tutorial   Download file


Questions or remarks? Leave your comments below. Don’t forget to share!

Closed captions in e-learning

View Demo Download SL1 file Download SL2 file

A while ago I was talking to a fellow developer and we discussed closed caption boxes for slides with voice-overs. The default Notes pane that you’ll find in Articulate Studio and Storyline might not be what you want to use as it doesn’t fit the design you’d want as naturally. Yet having the functionality of showing a learner what narration is being played on the slide can be desirable in some projects.

This may be rather obvious if you know there are people that are hard of hearing or deaf but less obvious if you take into account the fact that many organizations use open office spaces and, by default, do not supply headsets to their employees.

So, for your convenience, I quickly set up this example and decided to share it all of you.

If you like it or have any questions just let me know in the comments below.